Last allotment report for 2016

We have been very busy with the DIY, putting in new posts and finishing the first three of the new raised beds. The old potato tub was emptied, the hazel and willow were pruned and the prunings will be used as windbreaks. The old blackcurrant bush which had big bud removed and we dug out and transplanted one of the reducurrants. That was a long job since it was a mature bush but, with some very careful digging and careful use of the pick axe. we did save a lot of the root so it should survive. And a couple of welcome bonfires to burn up the waste and keep us warm.

leaf-mould

Last autumn we filled some black plastic bags with leaves as well as a green tub to see what, if any difference, there was. We also had the communal heap to compare the results to. The bags and tub have both produced a splendid result giving a friable mould ready to be to be spread on the beds as a soil conditioner. The mould from the tub was more friable so we have filled the spare tubs again with this year’s leaves.

We ended with a good picking of vegetables for the Christmas table: leek; swede; red cabbage; Jerusalem artichokes; Brussel sprouts; kale; chard and the last of the apples.

We shall have a gentle start in the middle of January with a meet-up for tea and buns somewhere warm and dry. How about Thursday 12 January at 10.30 in the Mortonhall Garden Centre?

February Pruning Workshop

The date for the fruit pruning workshop by George Anderson is Sunday 5 February at 14:00-15:30.

Merry Christmas and very happy growing New Year to all

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2 Responses to Last allotment report for 2016

  1. Rachel says:

    Great entry. My blackcurrants have been affected by big bud. I also dug them up and disposed of them but what wondering if it’s ok to replant new blackcurrants in the same place, or whether big bud can be retransmitted through the soil.

    • pamwhittle says:

      George says: Big Bud is something that tends to be transmitted and spread on air currents when the leaves unfurl and the Eriophid mites are blown around. If the infected bush has been dug up, cut up and well destroyed then there should be no problem with immediate spread. However I would not be inclined to replant a new blackcurrant in the same place.
      With the new bush, make sure that it is well pruned to ensure a plentiful supply of young fruiting wood, it should have one third removed each year leaving one third old wood and one third young wood. Feed and water well after planting. Hope this helps,

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